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Letters to the California Board of Behavioral Science and the American Psychological Association

These letters were written due to the incompetent and irresponsible responses from psychology. There was no response from the California Board of Behavioral sciences.

ATTN; Sherry Mehl, Chairperson

California Board of Behavioral Sciences

400 R Street, suite 3150

Sacramento CA, 95814-6240

2/15/00

RE; Cover letter and request for review of recommendations to C.S.M.H.

Dear Institute executives,

The included copy of EMOTIONS and MEMORY by David Rapaport, Ph.D.,1961, contains information vital to the safety and well being of California residents. The information indicates possible parameters for severe abuses of the knowledge of hypnosis beyond what has been accepted. As can be seen in the included opening statement by the attorney of the defendant in a civil action where I was the plaintiff, there is a statement that the plaintiff claims to have been "inflicted" with "harmful hypnotic telepathy". As the plaintiff I have never used the word telepathy. Consider that the defendant intends to introduce the language into legal proceedings as information for the use in the practice of psychology.

However psychologists are unwilling to comment on the material, obviously fearful of making legal precedent. This not a competent reaction and offensive in light of available information.

It is reasonable for me to state that the understandings by psychology of the extreme potentials of hypnotic abuses, for the sake of public safety, are necessary with or without legal consideration. The highlighted areas from page 172 to 182 of EMOTIONS and MEMORY as well as the two pages of opening statement and page 911 of Blacks Law, 1933 defining hypnotism, require integration with inference to answer these questions and thereby relieve, or make competent, practitioners in the field of psychology.

A. Can a person be hypnotized without their awareness?

B. Can barriers preventing memories be built with hypnosis?

C. Is memory dependent on meaning or emotion with hypnosis?

D. Could "transference" during hypnosis be an impression of telepathy?

If these questions can approximately answered by the appropriate specialists, with an affirmative, recommendations of the Board, to the State Department of Mental Health and the Department of Consumer Affairs, serving generally, the public safety, health and welfare, by establishing a need for appropriate information to the public concerning the possibilities of abuses and the effective treatments, should be made. Please advise me of your actions in this matter.

Thank you sincerely,

Christopher A. Brown

 

ATTN; Chairman of the Board of Directors

American Psychological Association

750 First Street, NE

Washington, DC 20002

2/15/00

RE; Cover letter and request for review of recommendations to C.S.M.H.

Dear Institute executives,

The included copy of EMOTIONS and MEMORY by David Rapaport, Ph.D.,1961, contains information vital to the safety and well being of Americans. The information indicates possible parameters for severe abuses of the knowledge of hypnosis beyond what has been accepted. As can be seen in the included opening statement by the attorney of the defendant in a civil action where I was the plaintiff, there is a statement that the plaintiff claims to have been "inflicted" with "harmful hypnotic telepathy". As the plaintiff I have never used the word telepathy. Consider that the defendant intends to introduce the language into legal proceedings as information for the use in the practice of psychology.

However psychologists are unwilling to comment on the material, obviously fearful of making legal precedent. This not a competent reaction and offensive in light of available information.

It is reasonable for me to state that the understandings by psychology of the extreme potentials of hypnotic abuses, for the sake of public safety, are necessary with or without legal consideration. The highlighted areas from page 172 to 182 of EMOTIONS and MEMORY as well as the two pages of opening statement and page 911 of Blacks Law, 1933 defining hypnotism, require integration with inference to answer these questions and thereby relieve, or make competent, practitioners in the filed of psychology.

A. Can a person be hypnotized without their awareness?

B. Can barriers preventing memories be built with hypnosis?

C. Is memory dependent on meaning or emotion with hypnosis?

D. Could "transference" during hypnosis be an impression of telepathy?

If these questions can approximately answered by the appropriate specialists, with an affirmative, recommendations of the American Psychological Association, to psychologists, serving generally public safety, health and welfare, by establishing a need for appropriate information to the public concerning the possibilities of abuses and the effective treatments, should be made. Please advise me of your actions in this matter.

Thank you sincerely,

Christopher A. Brown

The American Psychological Association received this letter

and

RESPONDED,

by letter dated MAY 22, 2000

(Remember that date)